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of climate change. >> oh dear. susan? >> federal government rate of the gibson guitar factory. they confiscated the merchandise because a small business took some wood -- that was the incorrect level of thickness. >> interesting. what a loss. >> the worst political theater? how the right turned benghazi tragedy into theater of the absurd. >> are you reading that now? >> i wanted to get it right and concise. >> listen to me now and watch this. understood reported story of 2012 the bright side of mexico. the bright side of mexico. but particularly its economy. you call mexico went down to a failed state on the program. now in the midst of a manufacturing rebound be exports up to 14%. up from 11%. creating jobs, boosting gdp and drawing mexican immigrants from the united states back home. okay. the most overreported story of 2012. pat? >> the election of 2012 primary and general election and the fiscal cliff. >> eleanor? >> political gaffes. i like to fire people. you didn't build that, corporations are people too my friend. and -- the -- what is it? the private sector is doing j
local government control. in the spirit of cooperation among members, -- members of both party the house-passed version of h.r. 6364 would have protected the d.c. war memorial and h.r. 6364 is amended -- as amended by the senate similarly will have no effect on the d.c. war memorial. in fact all the provisions regarding memorials have been removed from the bill. instead it establishes a commission to observe world war i across the country as we approach the centennial of the start of the war. i emphasize that the commission approach means that the reason this has been done reflects on nothing more than the fact that the commission approach -- approached two important commemorations almost always has been the -- the commission has been the approach. the usual approach, almost always, to important commemorations, and world war i had enormous effects on those who fought, on the nation, and on the world. more than four million member and -- men and women from the united states served in uniform in world war i. among them two future presidents, harry s. truman and dwight w.ize -- and dwight d
the longstanding recommendation of the government accountability office that the department perform a strategic review that they carry at the necessary security measures that the diplomats abroad and ensure that all necessary actions are present to prevent a recurrence. i know there will be an attempt to shift the responsibility for the tragedy to a shortage of resources. requests for more money are a familiar refrain in the state department reports. but budgetary constraints or not a factor in the department's failure to recognize the threats and adequately respond to this situation in benghazi that is and about misplaced priorities. if this department intends to blame its long string of failures on an adequate funding, then perhaps it should take a closer look at the money that is being lavished on the global climate change, colin marie diplomacy programs another fever project. this money could have been used for providing diplomatic security including hiring additional personnel and providing them with adequate equipment and training. this report and this hearing are just the beginning of ou
by the american federation of government employees -- proud to make america work. for more information about afge and membership, visit afge.org. >> production assistance was provided by all but in communications and politico, reporting on the political and legislative arena. >> this week on "inside ," the thrill of victory. >> barack obama has been reelected. >> the agony of defeat. >> this election is over, but our principles in north. >> the year 2012 in review. >> the supreme court has upheld the requirement that every american by health insurance. >> the year of the cliffhanger. >> raising tax rates is unacceptable. >> natural disasters. >> like the apocalypse. >> and human tragedies. >> saying someone is shooting in the auditorium. >> political fumbles. >> 5 seconds before you interrupted me. >> and shoppers. >> the seriousness of having a cia director involved in an extramarital affair cannot be overplayed. >> all right, as we look back, let's begin with the top political story of the year -- the freight -- the reelection of barack obama. as "time" magazine plus a cover story states, barac
-span would have more programs dealing with all of the options that could lessen the burden on the government and the taxpayer for the medical costs. i believe that in medicare buy- in -- i have 10 years left to go until medicare. i pay $620 a month for my health care. that is a lot of money. i would give that to the government and would usn't use t $100 or $200 a year. host: that is an important issue. we will focus more as the affordable care act t kicks in. for the suggestion -- thank you for the suggestion. the deficit is close to $16.4 trillion. this is part of the debate we will see at the start of the new congress. the so-called fiscal cliff was coined by ben bernanke. the story from "roll call." "it could be reached over this weekend." were heard from the house rules committee chairman yesterday. they are taking steps in advance to extend these tax cuts. a deal could be on the floor today if there is an agreement. from "the washington times" this morning. "offers fly, but still no agreement" is the headline. mitch mcconnell bypassed senator reid to speak directly to the vice president
] to listen to your -- [inaudible] and translate your views to the hard work of government. your meeting today will be young people ato -- the opportunity to debate issues that -- [inaudible] it's a big thing. i wish you the latest -- [inaudible] i look forward to hearing your debates. thank you. [applause] >> thank you for reading that. that is a delight to have the prime minister's support. i now call to say some words to us, the leader of the house of commons. mr. andrew. [applause] >> thank you, mr. speaker. [applause] thank you, mr. speaker. members of the you'll parking lotment, i'm debated to -- that righted to welcome you for the fourth annual sitting. the sitting have become an accomplished part of the parking parliament calendar. -- they have become so well established. and leader of the house, i am the representative of the government to this house of commons. and of the house of commons to the government. but today i am pleased to be able to be here to representative both the government and the house with you the youth parliament. i know, what is said here today will be heard both
at this moment is not in effect. the french government and francois hollande says, it won't make any difference. we'll rewrite the law using new wording and we'll catch more people in the 75% tax rate net. heather: stuart varney, i know you have a lot of work to do today. it is a busy day financially. thank you. >> thank you. gregg: what will it mean if lawmakers fail to strike a deal? according to the tax policy center 90% of the americans would see a tax hike in 2013. 121 million people will be paying a whole lot more in payroll taxs. those are social security payroll taxs. families making between 40 and $65,000 a year will have to pay an extra two grand to the u.s. government. the more you make, boy, that number really accelerates. heather? heather: another devastating blow in the fiscal cliff crisis, this mess, will be to the military. $500 billion slashed from the pentagon budget that is raising serious concerns about our national security. chairman of the house armed services committee, california congressman, bruce mckeown will weigh in on the impact these cuts will v that is live in our
. the government is too big and in effective we could take most of the money by decreasing spending. the 11th hour and there are a lot of people who shouldn't be having tax increases if we don't reach a compromise. so those are two different questions and i'm not about to give up the $1.2 trillion. we haven't cut a penny yet. so, that is not something i'm willing to give up. that is the thing. let start there. your book, your work, your speeches, you have identified hundreds and hundreds of billions of dollars of waste that the government doesn't need and the country doesn't need and it seems to evaporate. and from what i gather, the debate right now is whether to put off the spending cuts, it is always maniana when it come to spending, sir. and you no as well as i do, taxing the successful earners is not going to solve our problem. >> there is one bright side. if this bill happens, 95% of americans are going to have rates locked in. they are going to have some sernl ti for the future and that is one of the big things that is keeping us from growing now. they don't see the feature. is it a perfect
can move forward? >> well, first of all, we have to be able to govern. we have to have an adult conversation, getting people in the room who actually want to solve this problem. and i think it's very important to step back and see the fact that we have already -- there are three parts of this deficit reduction stool. we've already in the past two years passed $1.6 trillion in spending cuts. we've passed over $700 billion in savings in medicare through reforms like cutting back on overpayments to insurance companies. the one piece of this puzzle that we've not been able to get any support for is making sure that the wealthiest among us help solve this problem by being willing to pay a little bit more to be part of the solution. so we have sent a bill to the house back in july, bipartisan bill that says what -- everybody says they don't want middle-class families to have their taxes go up, well, fine. why don't we start with something we can agree on, which is that? and just pass that. why doesn't the house just pass that? but as we know, the speaker couldn't even pass his own pla
't he accepting it ne fuel? >> it would cause drawing up laws to govern what the pressure should do. this really was a question of the heart of all of this. how could you make sure that everybody was involvinged incluesing publishers that aren't to do so without the piece of legislation that would amount enemies of the system sucting to licensing. the law had to change. talks use similar language that would simply recognize an independent regulator in raw. this debate went for months and months and months. they were joined. it would billion far more something more owneress. that's what david cameron was addressing in some of of his concerns. how did it feel? >> we saw something rather by zard there. we heard from the two men, the prime minister and the deputy frimse. there were -- separation. one of those two men thinks new law is skential and the other not is not. >> in the backgrounds for a moment, you've got the last few months. will continue to cross party talks. but simultaneously you also god the crime city. try now that new regulator could be brought in into this new law if i
shrinking the government, making the government do less are actually good things. >> right, i don't think there's any question about that. we know there's an element of the republican party, ron paul, rand paul being the most visible, who think the less government does, the better. now, in that vain, i've been struck. david wasserman at the "cook political report" crunched the numbers on this, that there are 234 house republicans. 15 of them, 15 represent districts that president obama carried in 2012. given that, and we were talking with kelly about the fact that this has to come through the house at some point, that republicans still control. is there any reason for, politically speaking -- >> absolutely, right. >> -- not good of the country speaking, but politically speaking, is there any reason for these guys to make a deal given that for 215 of them, the constituency they represent are mitt romney's? >> i think this is the problem. where most people follow a presidential election and don't realize what happens in each of the districts. what republicans have done a very good job of in
this is coming up. the government will continue to function for a couple more months. emergency measures will be used to keep the money flowing, so to speak. this is unrelated to the fiscal cliff, so it's an additional problem that everybody has to deal with. of course the worst thing is we know how horrible it was the last time the debt ceiling needed to be raised in the summer of 2011, it went down to the wire and it looked as if there was a chance the united states would not raise the borrowing limit and default. we heard talk about social security payments not going out and that kind of thing. that's all led to the first downgrade in the u.s. credit rating, the stock market tanked. that was a ugly scenario. on top of the fiscal cliff, we may go through this all over again. it's another drag on the markets and on the whole economy at exactly the wrong time. >> when you say drag, though, give us an example of what you mean. we talked about january 2nd, everybody goes back to work and markets open. are we going to see a lot of volatility. all of a sudden it crashes down at once. what ha
our government is trying to do with the bickering and tearing each other down, tearing the country down. why in the world can these supposedly intelligent groups of men and women not get together to work out for the best interest of all concerned, all 330 billion americans, what is the best course to take? just take it. none of this squabbling. get together, folks. let's have some harmony in warrington. that is what we need. we need more on selfishness. a lot less ulterior motives. no more 2000 page bills that no one can understand. we do not need more of that crap in washington. we need some representation. get your act together. >> we are going next to minneapolis, minnesota. john, welcome. >> all of this gridlock going on right now, what is clearly evident to me is that the republican party has pure interests in mind. they're willing to touch medicare and social security, but not their own salaries, no steps against their own party to take the needs of the american people. how can you act together with a party that works purely for their own interests. my question is -- what can
, to pay for more government spending that doesn't help us with the deficit. and you hear members of congress, your republican colleagues who say, in my district, they don't want more spending. and that's how they see this money being spent. >> two things i would say. first of all, that is not the democratic position. no one that i know of is arguing that all of the increased revenue should go for increased spending nap simply isn't the case. by the way not having the sequester doesn't mean increased spending. it mean not having spending cuts. i voted against the idea of a sequester. i think it's not right way to do it. what the republicans want to do is spend more on defense. let me deal with this notion that republicans for cutting spending. you heard mitt romney criticize president obama because he's not spending enough on ships, which we don't need, and not staying long enough in the war zones. the republicans' view of spending is very particular one. secondly, as far as the american people are concerned, people in their districts, gee, if they represent districts in new jerse
agencies across the government, this to comply with across the board spending cuts 6% to 7% that are required in the so-called fiscal cliff. agencies will decide which employees to lay off and when. as part of these preparations, the administration also has notices it will soon deliver to delay or cancel federal government contracts. as for negotiations themselves it is a bit of a team effort here at the white house. president obama is dealing directly and spoke frequently sunday with the senate majority leader harry reid while vice president joe biden spoke frequently sunday with republican leader in the senate mitch mcconnell. mcconnell and biden get along much better than mcconnell does with president obama. in the last 24 hours, the administration has given ground on raising threshold for income tax rates and estate tax rates, but also demanded much more in new government spending the republicans are comfortable with. it's that division between spending and taxes that continues to divide both sides, and that is the one thing that may prevent
coming in to the federal government and regresive in many ways and what it does is funds social security. so should we have even been tinkering with that in the first place? >> one tax cut that, you know, the democrats lobbying for and the republicans did not want because it's technically a stimulative effort. don't forget when it was enacted we were in the middle of a crisis. i think, you know, all sides would probably agree it helped and worked but it's probably time to go away so that's sort of, you know, it is the most immediate thing and i think that was inevitable anyway. the far greater concern is the bush tax cuts and what happens to them. >> you talk about the middle class shouldn't feel the pain here and everybody agrees with that but the working class, absolutely shouldn't have to pay for this and feel the pain but taking, getting rid of unemployment ben filths, talk about the price of milk going up and other things like that, that will have a huge impact on the working class, people that don't have savings dealing with losing $3,400 and can't deal with that at all and that's
questions. the pentagon and all the other government agencies told their employees that they're not going to do anything with the sequester in january, because they're assuming congress will get its act together in january, february or so. so the idea that the markets are going to panic over this, you know, i think is a red herring. who knows? maybe they tank tomorrow. maybe they go through the roof. but i don't see that happening. though if it did that would drive things a little bit. >> do you have any sense they're feeling pressure from constituents at all? i would describe this as people are profoundly unhappy. >> that's a great point. congress' approval ratings are abysmal. but the pressure from the right for conservatives to cut a good deal, all this discussion about chained cpi is confusion. basically it means that republicans want to include entitlement reform as part of a deal. but why did they take that off the table? because when the debt ceiling comes next year, they can have a bigger fight about entitlement reform. so the big story today is that republicans are starting to re
that the government has the responsibility to care for them. who believe they are entitled to health care, to food, to housing, to you name it. and so my job is not to worry about these people. i'll never convince them that they should take personal responsibility. >> a very valuable comment. >> i am going to go with bill clinton. >> one speech? >> it was 20 years in the making, the story of the speech, for the first 15 years, republicans treated bill clinton that he was the worst thing that ever happened to american politics. the villain in chief, and after he left the white house, there was the moment in 2008, when republicans decided wait a minute, no, bill clinton is this by-gone symbol of an era, in moderation, they sang his praises for four years, set him up as the good democrat, against obama's bad democrat, and what happens, the good democrat vouches for the bad democrat and disarmed what a lot of republicans were saying about barack obama. >> you have made a reasonable argument. >> i think the enviable one was rick perry, who made the step of going full anti-out immigrant zealotry. >> it
this is a broader issue about western democracy. unless the markets do put governments under pressure, it's not easy to come up with such tough positions and i suspect that is going to be the case. it will be a recurring theme through the year, i suspect. >> and that's what i was going to suggest, this idea that we're going to come up with cliff after cliff after cliff, that maybe we're into a whole year of cliff diving, your expectation, let's say we get through the cliff with a baby deal. we've had still a number of economists come on this set and talk about how we could still be -- maybe not in a recession, but continue to see a slowdown. >> well, the other way i've been trying to think about the past 24 hours, you look at the private sector, there are two sources of great encouragement for the u.s. economy, it seems to me. one is the domestic housing story. and the second is, of course, the remarkable thing going on with energy based around shale, gas and oil. if these two sources of strength persist, you know, is the disappointment about the cliff enough to negate those two things? i suspect th
. both sides are bouncing this thing. citizens for self governance, president mark mcclure joined by occidental professor caroline helpmann. let's start with you. bad deal worse than no deal? >> it is, and we're talking about the fiscal cliff. we are really dealing with is the fiscal fraud. we fell off the cliff along time ago. we are in the best, $16 trillion in debt. a debt our children and grandchildren will never be able to pay off, a total fraud, not dealing with spending, and unless they do we are not going to fix the problems is a country is facing. tom: same point, i mean, is this something that will start tuesday or have businesses and individuals already started be having different because of the fact that this whole process was coming up in addition to what the congressman was talking about? >> certainly was tree has been reacting to this, but i very much disagree about the causes. that is when we extended tax cuts do so wealthy individuals in 2001 and three did not need them and then we saw an incredible decrease in revenue as a result of wall street tanking our econom
to be gathering some steam but washington, government, congress in particular is the single greatest impediment. it's a rational decision. >> get the act together. john avlon, thank you, my friend. don, it's a lot of intangibles here, don. this is the thing we have to think about. it's not just the tangibles of how much your taxes might go up or how much this might go down. it's the intangible of confidence. it's trust. you lose somebody's trust, how long does it take to get it back. it doesn't just come back tomorrow because you vote on something. >> i can't believe mitch mcconnell was there all day yesterday. >> it's crazy. >> he's working on a saturday. i never work on a saturday. wait a minute, i work every saturday. >> you get your job done. you don't get to tell your bosses, i'm going to do this another time. i'll get down to it in 516 days. >> but one day, one day i will be able to do that, at least i'd like to think that. >>> moving on, at the edge of the fiscal cliff, will the economy get sucked back into a recession or is a compromise possible? words of wisdom from a wall street journ
this roiling improvisation taking place. on government interactions. all that -- of it unplanned. at the center you have a man and the city is without like a big temple complex. and you can find those things at the same time, this radical coherence and freedom. it can begin to do something, then new creative -- you great meeting -- create meaning that is substantial. >> one of the most beautiful things, we were talking about are backstage. the idea of cultural capital, considering we're in a context of the economics of culture. one of the most beautiful things about the festival is if you look at this idea of spontaneous order, complexity theory, there is a lot of simple things that go into that. creating convention -- complex a from simple rules. do not call a festival, called a city. -- call it a festival, called it a city. we have created institutions, rather, they created themselves. we formalized it. there are ways of building social capital. one thing we did is we said there's no commerce at our event. that is a heterodox economic model. and then we set let's take a step further. make a m
. that will be a result of the federal government beginning a deleveraging process. something that is been well underway in the private sector for a long time. i think the result will be very good. i just think we need to get beyond all of this uncertainty with washington and in the private sector can go above doing its business. i think that outlook is good. shibani: i think a lot of us are looking forward to this uncertainty. we have debt ceilings. we also have a budget to get through. how do you position yourself? what sectors or stocks do think we'll be able to hold out anymore stable fashion? >> first of all, i think the second half will be a stronger one. in the short run, while that is going on, i think somebody's defensive sectors may still provide a good place to be. they will continue to be attractive. if you look at the market today, it is telling you how things are likely to perform in the second half. you see, for example, materials, technology, industrials doing very well. i think those will be the real eaters in the second half of the year. shibani: it will not happen as robustly here in
rates are way below normal, so when they spike, which they inevitably will, and the government is borrowing very short term to keep its costs down, the deficit is going to swamp the economy. and at that point you're going to have the debt crisis, and you're going to need a whole new stream of revenues. the only thing that paul krugman and paul ryan agree on, in a crisis situation, only a value-added tax will solve this problem. by raising marginal tax rates to get us out of this potential crisis. so we need very, very steep spending cuts, all of the emphasis and debate has been over marginal tax rates which are really a minor part of the solution, no matter what political strife you happen to be. you have to realize that tremendous spending cuts are necessary and already the -- any changes to social security have been ruled out in a short-term solution and it's going to be very difficult, congressman from oklahoma was correct, it's going to be hand-to-hand combat in the next session to get any cuts. no one is talking about major cuts except some on the republican side. >> i hea
't it now time to govern? >> the president was out of line with his comments at 1:30 afternoon. this is a delegate time. i think the democrats would be embased after what the president did. >> after months of the president promising a balanced approach there are only tax hikes for rich without new spending cuts. today he hinted at more tax hikes ahead. warning republicans that the future deficit reduction will not come from cuts alone. >> if they think that is the formula for how we solve this thing, they have another thing coming. that is not how it will work. >> republicans fire back it's time for presidential leadership, to stop exploding cost of programs like medicare. >> mr. president, i am willing to play along with my other republican colleagues the role of tip o'neil. you just need to play the role of ronald reagan. >> white house officials note the president tid offer dramatic cuts but it was speaker boehner who walked away from a $4 trillion deal. indeed, boehner may have trouble selling a time deal to conservatives after he repeatedly vowed tax hikes had to be couple
down the deficit? if you are going to use it for more government spending we don't want a part of it. senator mcconnell on the republican side seemed to get frustrated because he felt like the democrats were slow walking the th, 18 hours without a response. mcconnell made a call to a well known senator, joe biden to see if he could help. >> we're willing to work with whoever can help. no single issue remains an impossible sticking point. a sticking point appears to be a willingness and interest or frankly the courage to close the deal. >> reporter: as senate aide says it was designed to try to jumpstart the talks and consequences of getting a tax increase is a huge concern. >> gregg: what went awry in these talks? >> you heard senator thune. a fiscal cliff deal is a new way calculating inflation that would lower social security payments. democrats say they would do it as part of much bigger deal but it was off the table for the smaller deal they are working on. so democrats called it a poison pill. >> at some point, negotiating process, it appears there are things that stopped us fro
-- it will not be any more government bonds because we will be out of the debt situation. we saw it on the horizon. when george w. bush became president, he decided to go back on rates across the board to the wealthiest to the middle to the poor and he put to ban all wars on a credit card and we are where we are -- to banwo isa credit card and here we are. we are coming out of the worst recession since the great depression. it has been difficult -- led by unfortunately some unscrupulous people on wall street who created a nightmare in the housing market. i remember saying to treasury secretary paulson, can you please explain the role of derivative ofs to me and what happened and how we got into this crisis? he put his head in his hands and he said, not now, i will talk to you later. that is not a very encouraging thing when the secretary of the treasury puts his head in his hands and says, i cannot explain it now. we are coming out of this difficult time and, guess what, we are doing much better. we had an election. it was pretty clear people want to see us reach a balance here. so, as i stand here, i k
in the house. you're going to lose votes in the house because people in the house want to cut the government. i want to cut the government. i just don't want to destroy the defense department. >> do you have any idea, senator mccain, as we speak right now, when the senate will vote on whatever agreement has been reached? >> well, i think there's hopes that we, if we vote tonight or tomorrow, i know there are concerns about the sequestration aspect of it. we're also very concerned that there's no spending cuts associated with a tentative deal. but there's no doubt that the president -- straight talk, wolf. the president has won the election. he does have an advantage here. he has a larger approval rating than the congress does. but that doesn't mean that we sacrifice principle. sequestration to me is a principle. >> a very important issue. i assume they're going to work out an arrangement that they will delay that sequestration, those automatic defense cuts, at least for a few months. presumably that will -- i assume that will allow you, senator graham, to go ahead -- and you might not be thrill
this week to a wide array of government agencies, this to comply with across the board spending cuts. now agency will decide which employees to lay off and when. another thing the administration is doing is to send out notices to can sell or delay government contracts. they're in negotiations themselves. they appear to be stalled but it's kind of a team effort here at the white house. the president is negotiating regularly with senate majority leader harry reid and vice president joe biden is now in it. those two get along much better than mcconnell gets along with the president. over the last 24 hours the president has given some ground for higher levels for income taxes and estate taxes but is also along with that demanded much more in government spending than republicans are comfortable with. this is part of the impasse. and one of the things the administration wants to do is find some across the board spending cuts and cannes. ed government contracted due to take effect starting this week. >> all right. major garrett, thank you. wyoming senator john barrassow is with us. >> thank you
, declaring victory over its enemies to the rebels. that is code for the government saying we will crush you first. trace? >> trace: jonathan, we have heard warnings about the failure of the international community to really react to all of this. but some unusually strong language in the latest from the u.n. peace envoy. >> yeah. the peace envoy currently a man much more given to diplomatic language. this time is he saying that syria, quote: will be be transformed into hell. this coming year if the international community doesn't act other officials predicting that the death toll could rise as high as 100,000 civilians currently estimate human rights observers being something like 45,000 civilian deaths which, of course, is all evidence of what he says syria has been hell for quite some time already. trace. >> trace: what about bashar assad, jonathan. any sign that he is losing the will for this fight? >> well, there is always rumors surrounding bashar assad and his family. there is always speculation. but the reality on the ground is that he continues to direct his security forces to slaug
the nation's problems, to do what we sent you to washington to do, which is to govern, and here we are with a countdown clock at the bottom, ten hours, 51 minutes, and 34 seconds to get something done that should have gotten done, could have gotten done months ago. a lot of people are scratching their heads wishing, hoping that, you know, at some point congress will get et cetera act together. we do have a new congress coming back in. we keep talking about the so-called fiscal cliff. there are consequences for inaction if that countdown clock gets to zero and there's no deal and no deal has been reached. >> jonathan, thank you. to your point, it's remarkable to me that what we're debating is exactly what we were debating six months ago. it's not as though something has happened recently. this is the debate we've been having or the debate we haven't been having making it all the more remarkable that we have a countdown clock for it. thank you. >> that's right. >> a deal on the fiscal cliff may be at hand, but there's still a lot to do, and not a lot of time to do it. delaware democr
.s. government is going over the fiscal cliff, even as senate republicans and the white house reported progress had been made, but house republicans say they will not vote on anything tonight. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> suarez: and i'm ray suarez. on the newshour tonight, we have the latest on today's developments, including an update from todd zwillich of public radio international who's been tracking the story on the hill. >> woodruff: then, as secretary of state hillary clinton is hospitalized with a blood clot, we examine their causes and possible treatments. >> suarez: margaret warner talks to jonathan martin and glenn thrush of politico. their new e-book focuses on the crucial final month of the presidential race between barack obama and mitt romney. test. >> barack obama didn't perform that well until late and romney didn't perform the campaign well. campaign management is more important than an individual candidate's performance. >> woodruff: from boston, hari sreenivasan reports on a city- wide effort to keep kids engaged in education through meaningful work experiences. >> we
by a full vote in congress before it can take effect. had a deal not been reached by tonight the government would have been forced to buy milk at inflated prices, raising the doss of milk and other dairy products for consumers could have been 8 bucks a gallon, believe it or not. heather: secretary of state hillary clinton is now hospitalized after doctors discovered a blood clot during a recent follow-up exam stemming from a concussion earlier this month. david lee miller is joining us live from our new york city newsroom with the very latest on her condition. >> reporter: officials have not released specific details about secretary clinton's glad clot. medical experts say the severe a steve the problem depends on the location of the clot. most risky are the rain. she is being treated by anti-could he ago ooh atlantas and will remain at new york's presbyterian hospital until tuesday to monitor her medication. this is not the first time that mrs. clinton had been treated for a blood clot she had one in the back of her right leg in 1988, she described it as the most serious medical condition
at a prompt manslaughter university that government is broken and we just should throw it out. given the deadlock in washington does he have a point? we'll see what history has to tell us and debate fair & balanced. rick: a fox news alert. we are 15 minutes away from hearing from president obama who is scheduled to speak on the on going negotiation toss try to avoid going over the so-called fiscal cliff. we got word the president is going to talk. we have been getting word over the last couple of phepbts about the framework for a possible deal that has been reached. this is a tentative deal. but it does not at this point involve any spending cuts. it puts off the sequestration, the mandatory cuts that were set to take place if no deal was reached by january 1st. it also includes tax increases, tax rate increases on some upper income brackets. again these are all tentative reports about a possible deal. the president set to speak at about 1:30pm eastern time and we'll carry it for you live right here. arthel: new controversy surrounding the bankruptcy filing by the city of stockton, c
billion for the economy. that would help the federal government in terms of dealing with the deficit, but nonetheless, it still won't be enough, but it will be a start in that direction. that's the current cutoff, but we don't have that deal yet. absent that deal and as long as the clock keeps ticking, all of this is on the table for all of us. one more thing i should mention, bear in mind this past year, all of us have enjoyed a payroll tax vacation. payroll taxes were reduced across the country to help people deal with this bad economy right now. that's ending. there's no sign that's not going to end. everyone is going to pay a little more anyway. what we're worried about is this extra level on top. that is what many volters are paying attention to and that is the real bear in the woods that has democrats and republicans both worried about these negotiations. >> the clock, as you point out, is ticking, ticking, ticking right now. tom, thank you. >>> what's at stake for the millions of americans already out of a job once the country goes over the fiscal cliff? that and much more whe
rules so that your paycheck doesn't actually change. on the spending cut side, on the government sequester side, that is not solved, not clear that it will be. they may have to come back at that one. >> woodruff: so todd, at this point what you are watching as a reporter who has been covering this? the action is where? >> the action is in the senate democratic caucus. you're watching for a briefing that democrats want from the white house on the outlines of this deal. they want to lear from joe biden or one of his representatives. how did you arrive at this deal and what does it mean for us. you're watching for senators idea logical senators on both sides of this deal, liberals up set that the income threshold at 450, conservatives up set that there are no spending cuts in this deal t is all revenue. will somebody slow it down and block it. you have to watch it on the stat side because that pushes the senate over the cliff too. on the house side, once they're aware of what this deal is, how many votes can john boehner get on the republican side until you get to 218 through any co
agricultural law goes back into place, 1949 law, which basically means the federal government will go back in the business of strongly supporting the dairy industry by raising the price support, if you will, or support for dairy products to $38 a hundred weight. that's almost double what the price of milk is today. >> that price could even be $7 or more for a gallon of milk. the current national average is about $3.65. chris galen, he is the vice president of communications for the national milk producers federation. he says a price hike is also going to hurt the dairy farmers. he's joining us on the phone to tell us why. chris, good to have you here. first of all, explain to us how is it that the farmers themselves could be hurt as well if you don't have this farm bill extended. >> what we're asking congress to do, suzanne, is actually pass a new farm bill, as you mentioned, because that's going to provide dairy farmers a better safety net than what they've had in the past few years. 2012 was a really rough year for dairy farmers. they're really hurting now. we don't want to go back to th
the euro. new leadership, pay cuts, higher taxes as their weary government begs for more cash. committing to save the euro. it lives on, but for how long? >> the deadliest month to date as the assad regime intensified its air power. >> how much longer can this man hold on to power? bashar al assad was under even more intense pressure to step down but his regime stepped up the fire power against the opposition, civilians caught in the crossfire, more than 40,000 people have died so far. >> reporter: this is yet another bread line. >> the opposition fights on, making more dramatic gains than ever and gaining pledges of support from the international community. number one, she fought back from the brink of death after being attacked on a school bus. the taliban shot malala yousafzai. she survived, wake up in a british hospital and, according to her father, immediately asked for her school books. the world was gripped, moved and inspired by the story of one determined young girl facing down an entire network of armed militants and winning. zain verjee, cnn, london. >>> next, the stories that
.6 trillion the u.s. government spent last year, unless congress reaches a deal when the new year hits. so too will the fiscal cliff. $600 billion worth of tax increases and spending cuts. it is supposed to be automatic. but now republicans are suggesting a delay, the president just spoke trying to add pressure to congress to avoid going over the fiscal cliff. listen. >> my preference would have been to solve all these problems in the context of a larger agreement, a bigger deal, a grand bargain, whatever you want to call it, that solves our deficit problems in a balanced and responsible way that doesn't just deal with the taxes, but deals with the spending in a balanced way, so that we can put all this behind us focusing on growing our economy. but with this congress, that was obviously a little too much to hope for at this time. >> let's turn now to chief white house correspondent jessica yellin. let's talk a little bit about the outlines of the deal, the fact that the president came out to make his case and try to push this thing over the finish line. what does the white house have to do to
in areas where you essentially don't have governments that have a lot of capacity to protect those embassies. so we're doing a thorough review. not only will we implement the recommendations that were made, but we'll try to do more than that. with respect to who carried it out, that's an ongoing investigation. the fbi has sent individuals to libya repeatedly. we have some very good leads. but this is not something i'm going to be ad at liberty to talk about right now. >> in the politics, in the back and forth of this, do you feel like you let your friend, susan rice, hang out there in this? >> no. first of all, i was very clear that susan has been an outstanding u.n. ambassador for the united states. she appeared on a number of television shows reporting what she and we understood to be the best information at the time. this was a politically motivated attack on her. i mean, of all the people in my national security team, they probably had the least to do with anything that happened in benghazi. why she was targeted individually for the kind of attacks that she was subjected to is
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